The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult

17571433My honest opinion when I finished this book was;

“What?! Is this gonna end here like THIS?”

With NO definite denouement, the story ends rather abruptly. It made me feel as though there were another 20 to 30 pages to wrap up this story, but there weren’t.
At first, I found it rather anticlimactic; I was a bit disappointed to say the least.
That said, however, it was because I was so invested in the story. I wanted to know MORE about it, I really, really liked it!

That being said though, I now look back on it and think it was a fitting end considering the underlining theme of this book, The Storyteller, and The story goes on.
I now assume that Jodi Picoult chose not to close the story with a clear-cut ending, she intentionally chose to leave the rest of the story to us readers’ imagination just like Minka did.
In regard to this, I think it’s clever. Some readers may not be in favor of such endings, but I think I could live with it. (Well, of course, I could be completely off the mark, though.)

The writing was very strong yet has got some calm, quiet quality to it. Even during Minka’s retrospective soliloquy reflecting back on her experience in the Auschwitz, her narration felt very calm and collected. It wasn’t at all over-dramatic, but incredibly intense and poignant at times, it literally cut through my heart. It was just brilliant.

As for the story, the subject matter this book deals with is quite heavy; there’s no doubt about that. What struck me the most in Josef’s narration was that how desensitized and numb a person can be under the pretext of orders and code of conduct. Josef seemed to have been a bit red-blooded, but didn’t used to be THAT brutal, but during his time in the Army, he turned himself into a monster who is capable of shooting people in the head for no particular reason, just like squashing insects with his shoes.
This was what sent chills down my spine while I was reading this book.

On a bit more positive note, I loved how Sage and Leo’s paths cross as the story unfolds and how they both develop their affinity toward each other. It’s a fainty, slow-burn type of love and I absolutely adored the budding romance between them.

In addition to that, the relationship between Franz and Minka also tugged at my heartstrings.
I loved how Franz starts to see Minka in a different light, not merely as a prisoner who doesn’t deserve to live, but as a storyteller. I absolutely enjoyed the scenes where he saves her from a predicament and puts her under his supervision, telling her to write the story 10 pages a night and reading it aloud to him. I adored Franz’s gentleness despite being a SS soldier, despite the fact he may have committed unspeakable atrocities, killing numerous people in his wake.

That was all the more reason why it broke my heart when I read what Franz did to Minka.
I was like, “Why, Franz, Why?!”
But I knew the reason; He had to. He had no other option left for him to save her at that point, at his brother’s presence.
And the blank notebook anonymously left to Minka as if to say,
Keep the story going on.
Live as a storyteller.
It literally shattered my heart; my heart felt so constricted. So sad. So poignant. Ugh…

The huge twist in the end completely took me by surprise; I didn’t see it coming at all.
Man, what a twist! What an unexpected turn of events!

Like I said, with no definite end, I wonder what future holds for Sage.
Having read the decision Sage has reached upon Josef’s supplication to aid his death, I’m now really itching to know how the story unfolds for Sage and Leo.

What will happen to THEM?
Will Sage divulge the secret to Leo? And what will happen from now onwards?
How is Sage going to live down what she has done to Josef?

So many question marks swirl around my head.
This, however, might be exactly how the author wanted us readers to be.
Well done, Jodi Picoult. You got me there hands-down. I’m completely sold.

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